Archive for May 6th, 2008

Second Spring- Cardinal John Henry Newman

Posted on May 6, 2008. Filed under: Uncategorized |

“Arise, make haste, my love, my dove, my beautiful one, and come.
For the winter is now past, the rain is over and gone.
The flowers have appeared in our land.” —Cant., ii. 10-12.

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WE have familiar experience of the order, the constancy, the perpetual renovation of the material world which surrounds us.
Frail and transitory as is every part of it, restless and migratory as are its elements, never-ceasing as are its changes, still it abides.
It is bound together by a law of permanence, it is set up in unity; and, though it is ever dying, it is ever coming to life again.
Dissolution does but give birth to fresh modes of organization,
and one death is the parent of a thousand lives. Each hour, as it comes, is but a testimony, how fleeting, yet how secure, how certain,
is the great whole.
It is like an image on the waters, which is ever the same, though the waters ever flow.
Change upon change—yet one change cries out to another,
like the alternate Seraphim, in praise and in glory of their Maker.

The sun sinks to rise again; the day is swallowed up in the gloom of the night,
to be born out of it, as fresh as if it had never been quenched.
Spring passes into summer, and through summer and autumn into winter,
only the more surely, by its own ultimate return,
to triumph over that grave, towards which it resolutely hastened from its first hour.

We mourn over the blossoms of May, because they are to wither; but we know, withal, that May is one day to have its revenge upon November, by the revolution of that solemn circle which never stops—
which teaches us in our height of hope,
ever to be sober, and in our depth of desolation,
never to despair.

And forcibly as this comes home to every one of us,
not less forcible is the contrast which exists between this material world,
so vigorous, so reproductive, amid all its changes,
and the moral world,
so feeble, so downward, so resourceless, amid all its aspirations.
That which ought to come to nought, endures;
that which promises a future, disappoints and is no more.
The same sun shines in heaven from first to last,
and the blue firmament, the everlasting mountains, reflect his rays;
but where is there upon earth
the champion, the hero, the lawgiver, the body politic, the sovereign race,
which was great three hundred years ago,
and is great now?

Moralists and poets, often do they descant upon this innate vitality of matter,
this innate perishableness of mind.
Man rises to fall: he tends to dissolution from the moment he begins to be;
he lives on, indeed, in his children,
he lives on in his name,
he lives not on in his own person.

He is, as regards the manifestations of his nature here below, as a bubble that breaks,
and as water poured out upon the earth.
He was young, he is old, he is never young again.
This is the lament over him, poured forth in verse and in prose,
by Christians and by heathen.

The greatest work of God’s hands under the sun, he, in all the manifestations
of his complex being, is born only to die.

His bodily frame first begins to feel the power of this constraining law,
though it is the last to succumb to it.

We look at the bloom of youth with interest, yet with pity;
and the more graceful and sweet it is, with pity so much the more;
for, whatever be its excellence and its glory, soon it begins to be
deformed and dishonoured by the very force of its living on.
It grows into exhaustion and collapse,
till at length it crumbles into that dust out of which it was originally taken.

So is it, too, with our moral being,
a far higher and diviner portion of our natural constitution;
it begins with life, it ends with what is worse than the mere loss of life, with a living death.

How beautiful is the human heart, when it puts forth its first leaves,
and opens and rejoices in its spring-tide.
Fair as may be the bodily form, fairer far, in its
green foliage and bright blossoms, is natural virtue.
It blooms in the young, like some rich flower,
so delicate, so fragrant, and so dazzling.
Generosity and lightness of heart and amiableness,
the confiding spirit, the gentle temper, the elastic cheerfulness,
the open hand, the pure affection, the noble aspiration,
the heroic resolve, the romantic pursuit,
the love in which self has no part,—are not these beautiful?

and are they not dressed up and set forth for admiration
in their best shapes, in tales and in poems?
and ah! what a prospect of good is there!
who could believe that it is to fade!
and yet, as night follows upon day,
as decrepitude follows upon health,
so surely are failure, and overthrow, and annihilation,
the issue of this natural virtue,
if time only be allowed to it to run its course.

There are those who are cut off in the first opening of this excellence,
and then, if we may trust their epitaphs, they have lived like angels;
but wait a while, let them live on, let the course of life proceed,
let the bright soul go through the fire and water of the world’s temptations and seductions
and corruptions and transformations;
and, alas for the insufficiency of nature!
alas for its powerlessness to persevere,
its waywardness in disappointing its own promise!

Wait till youth has become age; and not more different is
the miniature which we have of him when a boy,
when every feature spoke of hope,
put side by side of the large portrait painted to his honour,
when he is old, when his limbs are shrunk, his eye dim,
his brow furrowed, and his hair grey,
than differs the moral grace of that boyhood
from the forbidding and repulsive aspect of his soul, now that he has lived to the age of man.

For moroseness, and misanthropy, and selfishness, is the ordinary winter of that spring.

Such is man in his own nature, and such, too, is he in his works.

The noblest efforts of his genius, the conquests he has made,
the doctrines he has originated, the nations he has civilized,
the states he has created, they outlive himself, they outlive him by many centuries,
but they tend to an end,
and that end is dissolution.

Powers of the world,
sovereignties, dynasties,
sooner or later come to nought; they have their fatal hour.
The Roman conqueror shed tears over Carthage,
for in the destruction of the rival city he discerned too truly an augury of the fall of Rome;
and at length, with the weight and the responsibilities,
the crimes and the glories, of centuries upon centuries,
the Imperial City fell.

Thus man and all his works are mortal;
they die, and they have no power of renovation.

But what is it, my Fathers,my Brothers,
what is it that has happened in England just at this time?

Something strange is passing over this land, by the very surprise, by the very commotion, which it excites.

Were we not near enough the scene of action to be able to say what is going on,
—were we the inhabitants of some sister planet possessed of a more perfect mechanism than this earth has discovered for surveying the transactions of another globe,—and did we turn our eyes thence towards England just at this season, we should be arrested by a political phenomenon as wonderful as any which the astronomer notes down from his physical field of view. It would be the occurrence of a national commotion, almost without parallel, more violent than has happened here for centuries, — at least in the judgements and intentions of men, if not is act and deed. We should note it down,

that soon after St. Michael’s day, 1850, a storm arose in the moral world,
so furious as to demand some great explanation,
and to rouse in us an intense desire to gain it.

We should observe it increasing from day to day,
and spreading from place to place, without remission,
almost without lull, up to this very hour,
when perhaps it threatens worse still,
or at least gives no sure prospect of alleviation.

Every party in the body politic undergoes its influence,
—from the Queen upon her throne, down to the little ones in the infant or day school.
The ten thousands of the constituency,
the sum-total of Protestant sects,
the aggregate of religious societies and associations,
the great body of established clergy in town and country,
the bar, even the medical profession, nay, even literary and scientific circles,
every class, every interest,
every fireside, gives tokens of this ubiquitous storm.

This would be our report of it, seeing it from the distance,
and we should speculate on the cause. What is it all about? against what is it directed? what wonder has happened upon earth? what prodigious, what preternatural event is adequate to the burden of so vast an effect? ……

We should judge rightly in our curiosity about a phenomenon like this;
it must be a portentous event, and it is.
It is an innovation, a miracle, I may say, in the course of human events.

The physical world revolves year by year, and begins again;
but the political order of things does not renew itself,
does not return; it continues, but it proceeds; there is no retrogression.

This is so well understood by men of the day,
that with them progress is idolized as another name for good. The past never returns—it is never good;
—if we are to escape existing ills, it must be by going forward.
The past is out of date; the past is dead.
As well may the dead live to us,
well may the dead profit us, as the past return.
This, then, is the cause of this national transport,
this national cry, which encompasses us.

The past has returned, the dead lives. Thrones are overturned and are never restored; States live and die, and then are matter only for history.

Babylon was great, and Tyre, and Egypt, and Nineve,
and shall never be again.

The English Church was, and the English Church was not, and the English Church is once again. This is the portent, worthy of a cry.

It is the coming of a Second Spring; it is a restoration in the moral world,
such as that which yearly takes place in the physical..

Read complete text
http://www.newmanreader.org/works/occasions/sermon10.html

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Hail Holy Queen, show us the Blessed Fruit of thy womb, Jesus Eucharistic

Posted on May 6, 2008. Filed under: Uncategorized |

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy,
Our life, our sweetness, and our hope.
To thee do we cry,poor, banished children of Eve.
To thee do we send up our sighs,
mourning, and weeping in this valley of tears.
Turn then, O most gracious advocate,thine eyes of mercy toward us
and even during this our exile
show unto us the Blessed Fruit of thy womb,Jesus Eucharistic!

O clement! O loving! O sweet Virgin Mary!
Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God!
Make us worthy of the promises of Christ .

Come, O Holy Spirit! Come!

Ven. Mary of Agreda- City of God
CHAPTER III.
BAPTISM OF THE CONVERTS. THE FIRST MASS. PERPETUAL PRESENCE OF THE HOLY SPECIES IN MARY.
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Hail, Eucharistic Face, Epiphany of the Father’s love

Posted on May 6, 2008. Filed under: Uncategorized |

Hail, Festival Day!
Hail, Day of Sion’s sweetest hymns!
Hail, Day of timeless adoration!
Hail, Day of lavish jubilation!
Hail, Day of our most fragrant incense!
Hail, Day of flowers strewn before their Maker!
Hail, Day of flames dancing in the presence of the Fire!
Hail, Day of a silence that is song!
Hail Day of a song become silence!
Hail, Day made radiant by the Face that shines like the sun in full strength!
Hail, Day made lovely by the Face of the fairest of the children of men!
Hail, Day rising to see the Face once hidden in the tabernacle of the Virgin’s womb!
Hail, Day rejoicing in the Human Face of God concealed in bread and wine!
Hail, Eucharistic Face reflecting the Glory of the Father
and bearing the very stamp of His nature!
Hail, Eucharistic Face, Living Icon of the Father!
Hail, Eucharistic Face, Epiphany of the Father’s Love!
Hail, Eucharistic Face, Kindly Light amidst the gloom!
Hail, Eucharistic Face of the Crucified in the Sacrament of Your abiding presence!
Hail, Eucharistic Face of Life conquering death!
Hail, Eucharistic Face of Mercy rising in the night with healing in your rays!
Hail, Eucharistic Face, Sweetness leaving no bitterness!
Hail, Eucharistic Face of the Risen One,
filling earth and heaven with glory
from the rising of the sun even to its setting
in the offering of your pure and eternal Oblation!
Hail, Eucharistic Face raising the dead to life!
Hail, Eucharistic Face breathing peace into every troubled place!
Hail, Eucharistic Face, revelation of a Heart full of mercy and ready to forgive!
Hail, Eucharistic Face of the Ascended One!
Hail, Eucharistic Face of the High Priest interceding for us beyond the veil!
Hail, Eucharistic Face of the Victim reconciling heaven and earth!
Hail, Eucharistic Face all ablaze with the Holy Spirit’s fire!
Hail, Eucharistic Face of the King who will return in glory!
Hail, Eucharistic Face hidden from the powerful, the clever, and the wise!
Hail, Eucharistic Face revealed to the pure of heart!
Hail, Eucharistic Face familiar to little children and to those like them!
Hail, Eucharistic Face of the Divine Wayfarer!
Hail, Eucharistic Face, unrecognized and unknown in the midst of men!
Hail, Eucharistic Face shrouded in silence,
and with us always, even unto the consummation of the world!
Hail, God–With–Us!
Hail, God–Turned–Toward–Us!
Hail, God who with immense yearning desire to share your Pasch with us!
Hail, God–in–Search–of–Those–Who–Hunger!
God–in–Search–of–Those–Who–Thirst!
Hail, O inexhaustible and precious Chalice!
Hail, Day of the Altar and of the Blood!
Hail, Day of the new and everlasting covenant!
Hail, Day that calls us anew to obedience:“All that the Lord has spoken
we will do,and we will be obedient” (Ex 24:7).
“This is my Body which is given for you.
This Chalice poured out for you is the new covenant in my Blood.
Do this in remembrance of me” (cf. Lk 22:19–20).
Hail, Day of the Blood without which there is no pardon!
Hail, Day of the Blood poured out for the refreshment of the weary!
Hail, Day of the Blood that flows, a river of mercy in the wastelands of sin!
Hail, Day of the Blood that vanquishes demons!
Hail, Day of the Blood that consoles in sorrow!
Hail, Day of the Blood that cleanses the entire world of sin!
Hail, Day of the Blood of Christ, Victim and Priest!
Hail, Day of the Blood presented in the sanctuary not made by hands!
Hail, Day of the Blood offered on earth as it is in heaven!
Hail, Precious Chalice lifted up for all to see!
Hail, Precious Chalice, thanksgiving sacrifice worthy of God!
Hail, Precious Chalice held to the lips of the martyrs!
Hail, Precious Chalice strengthening every witness!
Hail, Precious Chalice making pure the impure!
Hail, Precious Chalice containing the Fire of the Divinity!
Hail, Precious Chalice, the antidote for every poison!
Hail, Precious Chalice, the remedy for every ill!
Hail, Day of the Upper Room made ready for eternity!
Hail, Day of the Pasch without end!
Hail, Day of the Bread lifted up in Christ’s holy and venerable hands!
Hail, Day of the blessing uttered by His sacred lips!
Hail, Day of the Body forever given and of the Blood forever poured out!
Hail, Day of the Cenacle opened to every nation on earth!
Hail, Day of the Mystical Supper open to the poor,
the sick, the lame, and the blind!
Hail, Day of Heaven’s open door!
Hail, Day of the Supper of the Lamb!
Hail, Day that sees us prostrate before the Eucharistic Face of God!
Hail, Day on which men do the work of Angels!
Hail, Day on which Angels stand amazed
before the Mystery set before the children of men!
Hail, Day that passes too quickly and never passes!
Hail, Day that begins in time the joys of eternity!
Hail, Day that fills the earth with a foretaste of heaven!
Amen. Alleluia.

(Thank you, Father Mark, for giving words to the song of my heart)
Veni, Creator Spiritus!

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Thine eyes shall see the King in His beauty: they shall behold the land that is very far off. Isaiah xxxiii. 17

Posted on May 6, 2008. Filed under: Uncategorized |

-For the form of this world is passing away. 1 Cor7:31b

Sermon 3 – Cardinal Newman – Unreal Words

We are no longer then in the region of shadows:
we have the true Saviour set before us,
the true reward, and the true means of spiritual renewal.
We know the true state of the soul by nature and by grace,
the evil of sin, the consequences of sinning,
the way of pleasing God, and the motives to act upon.
God has revealed Himself clearly to us;

He has “destroyed the face of the covering cast over all people,
and the veil that is spread over all nations.”

“The darkness is past, and the True Light now shineth.”
[Isa. xxv. 7. 1 John ii. 8.]

And therefore, I say, He calls upon us in turn to “walk in the light as He is in the light.”

The are are ten thousand ways of looking at this world, but only one right way.
The man of pleasure has his way, the man of gain his, and the man of intellect his. Poor men and rich men, governors and governed, prosperous and discontented, learned and unlearned, each has his own way of looking at the things which come before him, and each has a wrong way.

There is but one right way; it is the way in which God looks at the world.
Aim at looking at it in God’s way.
Aim at seeing things as God sees them.
Aim at forming judgements about persons, events, ranks, fortunes, changes, objects, such as God forms.
Aim at looking at this life as God looks at it.
Aim at looking at the life to come, and the world unseen, as God does.

Aim at “seeing the King in all His beauty.”

All things that we see are but shadows to us and delusions, unless we enter into what they really mean.

It is not an easy thing to learn that new language which Christ has brought us.
He has interpreted all things for us in a new way;
He has brought us a religion which sheds a new light on all that happens.
Try to learn this language. Do not get it by rote, or speak it as a thing of course.
Try to understand what you say.
Time is short, eternity is long;
God is great, man is weak; he stands between heaven and hell;
Christ is his Saviour; Christ has suffered for him.
The Holy Ghost sanctifies him; repentance purifies him,
faith justifies, works save.
These are solemn truths, which need not be actually spoken,
except in the way of creed or of teaching; but which must be laid up in the heart.
That a thing is true, is no reason that it should be said, but that it should be done; that it should be acted upon; that it should be made our own inwardly.

Let us avoid talking, of whatever kind;
whether mere empty talking, or censorious talking,
or idle profession, or descanting upon Gospel doctrines,
or the affectation of philosophy,
or the pretence of eloquence.
Let us guard against frivolity,
love of display,
love of being talked about,
love of singularity,
love of seeming original.
Let us aim at meaning what we say,
and saying what we mean;
let us aim at knowing when we understand a truth, and when we do not.
When we do not, let us take it on faith, and let us profess to do so.
Let us receive the truth in reverence,
and pray God to give us a good will, and divine light,
and spiritual strength, that it may bear fruit within us. –

http://www.newmanreader.org/works/parochial/volume5/sermon3.html
Cardinal John Henry Newman

see also
– the homily of the Holy Father Pope Benedict XVI
Yankee Stadium April 2008

And this, dear friends, is the particular challenge which the Successor of Saint Peter sets before you today. As “a chosen people, a royal priesthood, a holy nation”, follow faithfully in the footsteps of those who have gone before you! Hasten the coming of God’s Kingdom in this land! Past generations have left you an impressive legacy. In our day too, the Catholic community in this nation has been outstanding in its prophetic witness in the defense of life, in the education of the young, in care for the poor, the sick and the stranger in your midst. On these solid foundations, the future of the Church in America must even now begin to rise!

True freedom blossoms when we turn away from the burden of sin, which clouds our perceptions and weakens our resolve, and find the source of our ultimate happiness in him who is infinite love, infinite freedom, infinite life. “In his will is our peace”.

see also
Revelation 21

The New Heaven and Earth
1 Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth; for the first heaven and the first earth passed away, and there is no longer any sea. 2 And I saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, made ready as a bride adorned for her husband. 3 And I heard a loud voice from the throne, saying, “Behold, the tabernacle of God is among men, and He will dwell among them, and they shall be His people, and God Himself will be among them, 4 and He will wipe away every tear from their eyes; and there will no longer be any death; there will no longer be any mourning, or crying, or pain; the first things have passed away.” 5 And He who sits on the throne said, “Behold, I am making all things new.” And He said, “Write, for these words are faithful and true.” 6 Then He said to me, “It is done. I am the Alpha and the Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give to the one who thirsts from the spring of the water of life without cost. 7 “He who overcomes will inherit these things, and I will be his God and he will be My son. 8 “But for the cowardly and unbelieving and abominable and murderers and immoral persons and sorcerers and idolaters and all liars, their part will be in the lake that burns with fire and brimstone, which is the second death.” 9 Then one of the seven angels who had the seven bowls full of the seven last plagues came and spoke with me, saying, “Come here, I will show you the bride, the wife of the Lamb.”
The New Jerusalem
10 And he carried me away in the Spirit to a great and high mountain, and showed me the holy city, Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, 11 having the glory of God. Her brilliance was like a very costly stone, as a stone of crystal-clear jasper. 12 It had a great and high wall, with twelve gates, and at the gates twelve angels; and names were written on them, which are the names of the twelve tribes of the sons of Israel. 13 There were three gates on the east and three gates on the north and three gates on the south and three gates on the west. 14 And the wall of the city had twelve foundation stones, and on them were the twelve names of the twelve apostles of the Lamb.

see also
Psalm 101(102)

Psalm 101 next >
Domine, exaudi. A prayer for one in affliction: the fifth penitential psalm.

1 The prayer of the poor man, when he was anxious, and poured out his supplication before the Lord.

2 Hear, O Lord, my prayer: and let my cry come to thee.

3 Turn not away thy face from me: in the day when I am in trouble, incline thy ear to me. In what day soever I shall call upon thee, hear me speedily.

4 For my days are vanished like smoke: and my bones are grown dry like fuel for the fire.

5 I am smitten as grass, and my heart is withered: because I forgot to eat my bread.

6 Through the voice of my groaning, my bone hath cleaved to my flesh.

7 I am become like to a pelican of the wilderness: I am like a night raven in the house.

8 I have watched, and am become as a sparrow all alone on the housetop.

9 My enemies reproached me: and they that praised me did swear against me.

10 For I did eat ashes like bread, and mingled my drink with weeping.

11 Because of thy anger and indignation: for having lifted me up thou hast thrown me down.

12 My days have declined like a shadow, and I am withered like grass.

13 But thou, O Lord, endurest for ever: and thy memorial to all generations.

14 Thou shalt arise and have mercy on Sion: for it is time to have mercy on it, for the time is come.

15 For the stones thereof have pleased thy servants: and they shall have pity on the earth thereof.

16 And the Gentiles shall fear thy name, O Lord, and all the kings of the earth thy glory.

17 For the Lord hath built up Sion: and he shall be seen in his gory.

18 He hath had regard to the prayer of the humble: and he hath not despised their petition.

19 Let these things be written unto another generation: and the people that shall be created shall praise the Lord:

20 Because he hath looked forth from his high sanctuary: from heaven the Lord hath looked upon the earth.

21 That he might hear the groans of them that are in fetters: that he might release the children of the slain:

22 That they may declare the name of the Lord in Sion: and his praise in Jerusalem;

23 When the people assemble together, and kings, to serve the Lord.

24 He answered him in the way of his strength: Declare unto me the fewness of my days.

25 Call me not away in the midst of my days: thy years are unto generation and generation.

26 In the beginning, O Lord, thou foundedst the earth: and the heavens are the works of thy hands.

27 They shall perish but thou remainest: and all of them shall grow old like a garment: And as a vesture thou shalt change them, and they shall be changed.

28 But thou art always the selfsame, and thy years shall not fail.

29 The children of thy servants shall continue: and their seed shall be directed for ever.

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Second Spring- Cardinal John Henry Newman

Posted on May 6, 2008. Filed under: Uncategorized |

“Arise, make haste, my love, my dove, my beautiful one, and come.
For the winter is now past, the rain is over and gone.
The flowers have appeared in our land.” —Cant., ii. 10-12.

+
WE have familiar experience of the order, the constancy, the perpetual renovation of the material world which surrounds us.
Frail and transitory as is every part of it, restless and migratory as are its elements, never-ceasing as are its changes, still it abides.
It is bound together by a law of permanence, it is set up in unity; and, though it is ever dying, it is ever coming to life again.
Dissolution does but give birth to fresh modes of organization,
and one death is the parent of a thousand lives. Each hour, as it comes, is but a testimony, how fleeting, yet how secure, how certain,
is the great whole.
It is like an image on the waters, which is ever the same, though the waters ever flow.
Change upon change—yet one change cries out to another,
like the alternate Seraphim, in praise and in glory of their Maker.

The sun sinks to rise again; the day is swallowed up in the gloom of the night,
to be born out of it, as fresh as if it had never been quenched.
Spring passes into summer, and through summer and autumn into winter,
only the more surely, by its own ultimate return,
to triumph over that grave, towards which it resolutely hastened from its first hour.

We mourn over the blossoms of May, because they are to wither; but we know, withal, that May is one day to have its revenge upon November, by the revolution of that solemn circle which never stops—
which teaches us in our height of hope,
ever to be sober, and in our depth of desolation,
never to despair.

And forcibly as this comes home to every one of us,
not less forcible is the contrast which exists between this material world,
so vigorous, so reproductive, amid all its changes,
and the moral world,
so feeble, so downward, so resourceless, amid all its aspirations.
That which ought to come to nought, endures;
that which promises a future, disappoints and is no more.
The same sun shines in heaven from first to last,
and the blue firmament, the everlasting mountains, reflect his rays;
but where is there upon earth
the champion, the hero, the lawgiver, the body politic, the sovereign race,
which was great three hundred years ago,
and is great now?

Moralists and poets, often do they descant upon this innate vitality of matter,
this innate perishableness of mind.
Man rises to fall: he tends to dissolution from the moment he begins to be;
he lives on, indeed, in his children,
he lives on in his name,
he lives not on in his own person.

He is, as regards the manifestations of his nature here below, as a bubble that breaks,
and as water poured out upon the earth.
He was young, he is old, he is never young again.
This is the lament over him, poured forth in verse and in prose,
by Christians and by heathen.

The greatest work of God’s hands under the sun, he, in all the manifestations
of his complex being, is born only to die.

His bodily frame first begins to feel the power of this constraining law,
though it is the last to succumb to it.

We look at the bloom of youth with interest, yet with pity;
and the more graceful and sweet it is, with pity so much the more;
for, whatever be its excellence and its glory, soon it begins to be
deformed and dishonoured by the very force of its living on.
It grows into exhaustion and collapse,
till at length it crumbles into that dust out of which it was originally taken.

So is it, too, with our moral being,
a far higher and diviner portion of our natural constitution;
it begins with life, it ends with what is worse than the mere loss of life, with a living death.

How beautiful is the human heart, when it puts forth its first leaves,
and opens and rejoices in its spring-tide.
Fair as may be the bodily form, fairer far, in its
green foliage and bright blossoms, is natural virtue.
It blooms in the young, like some rich flower,
so delicate, so fragrant, and so dazzling.
Generosity and lightness of heart and amiableness,
the confiding spirit, the gentle temper, the elastic cheerfulness,
the open hand, the pure affection, the noble aspiration,
the heroic resolve, the romantic pursuit,
the love in which self has no part,—are not these beautiful?

and are they not dressed up and set forth for admiration
in their best shapes, in tales and in poems?
and ah! what a prospect of good is there!
who could believe that it is to fade!
and yet, as night follows upon day,
as decrepitude follows upon health,
so surely are failure, and overthrow, and annihilation,
the issue of this natural virtue,
if time only be allowed to it to run its course.

There are those who are cut off in the first opening of this excellence,
and then, if we may trust their epitaphs, they have lived like angels;
but wait a while, let them live on, let the course of life proceed,
let the bright soul go through the fire and water of the world’s temptations and seductions
and corruptions and transformations;
and, alas for the insufficiency of nature!
alas for its powerlessness to persevere,
its waywardness in disappointing its own promise!

Wait till youth has become age; and not more different is
the miniature which we have of him when a boy,
when every feature spoke of hope,
put side by side of the large portrait painted to his honour,
when he is old, when his limbs are shrunk, his eye dim,
his brow furrowed, and his hair grey,
than differs the moral grace of that boyhood
from the forbidding and repulsive aspect of his soul, now that he has lived to the age of man.

For moroseness, and misanthropy, and selfishness, is the ordinary winter of that spring.

Such is man in his own nature, and such, too, is he in his works.

The noblest efforts of his genius, the conquests he has made,
the doctrines he has originated, the nations he has civilized,
the states he has created, they outlive himself, they outlive him by many centuries,
but they tend to an end,
and that end is dissolution.

Powers of the world,
sovereignties, dynasties,
sooner or later come to nought; they have their fatal hour.
The Roman conqueror shed tears over Carthage,
for in the destruction of the rival city he discerned too truly an augury of the fall of Rome;
and at length, with the weight and the responsibilities,
the crimes and the glories, of centuries upon centuries,
the Imperial City fell.

Thus man and all his works are mortal;
they die, and they have no power of renovation.

But what is it, my Fathers,my Brothers,
what is it that has happened in England just at this time?

Something strange is passing over this land, by the very surprise, by the very commotion, which it excites.

Were we not near enough the scene of action to be able to say what is going on,
—were we the inhabitants of some sister planet possessed of a more perfect mechanism than this earth has discovered for surveying the transactions of another globe,—and did we turn our eyes thence towards England just at this season, we should be arrested by a political phenomenon as wonderful as any which the astronomer notes down from his physical field of view. It would be the occurrence of a national commotion, almost without parallel, more violent than has happened here for centuries, — at least in the judgements and intentions of men, if not is act and deed. We should note it do
wn,

that soon after St. Michael’s day, 1850, a storm arose in the moral world,
so furious as to demand some great explanation,
and to rouse in us an intense desire to gain it.

We should observe it increasing from day to day,
and spreading from place to place, without remission,
almost without lull, up to this very hour,
when perhaps it threatens worse still,
or at least gives no sure prospect of alleviation.

Every party in the body politic undergoes its influence,
—from the Queen upon her throne, down to the little ones in the infant or day school.
The ten thousands of the constituency,
the sum-total of Protestant sects,
the aggregate of religious societies and associations,
the great body of established clergy in town and country,
the bar, even the medical profession, nay, even literary and scientific circles,
every class, every interest,
every fireside, gives tokens of this ubiquitous storm.

This would be our report of it, seeing it from the distance,
and we should speculate on the cause. What is it all about? against what is it directed? what wonder has happened upon earth? what prodigious, what preternatural event is adequate to the burden of so vast an effect? ……

We should judge rightly in our curiosity about a phenomenon like this;
it must be a portentous event, and it is.
It is an innovation, a miracle, I may say, in the course of human events.

The physical world revolves year by year, and begins again;
but the political order of things does not renew itself,
does not return; it continues, but it proceeds; there is no retrogression.

This is so well understood by men of the day,
that with them progress is idolized as another name for good. The past never returns—it is never good;
—if we are to escape existing ills, it must be by going forward.
The past is out of date; the past is dead.
As well may the dead live to us,
well may the dead profit us, as the past return.
This, then, is the cause of this national transport,
this national cry, which encompasses us.

The past has returned, the dead lives. Thrones are overturned and are never restored; States live and die, and then are matter only for history.

Babylon was great, and Tyre, and Egypt, and Nineve,
and shall never be again.

The English Church was, and the English Church was not, and the English Church is once again. This is the portent, worthy of a cry.

It is the coming of a Second Spring; it is a restoration in the moral world,
such as that which yearly takes place in the physical..

Read complete text
http://www.newmanreader.org/works/occasions/sermon10.html

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Hail Holy Queen, show us the Blessed Fruit of thy womb, Jesus Eucharistic

Posted on May 6, 2008. Filed under: Uncategorized |

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy,
Our life, our sweetness, and our hope.
To thee do we cry,poor, banished children of Eve.
To thee do we send up our sighs,
mourning, and weeping in this valley of tears.
Turn then, O most gracious advocate,thine eyes of mercy toward us
and even during this our exile
show unto us the Blessed Fruit of thy womb,Jesus Eucharistic!

O clement! O loving! O sweet Virgin Mary!
Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God!
Make us worthy of the promises of Christ .

Come, O Holy Spirit! Come!

Ven. Mary of Agreda- City of God
CHAPTER III.
BAPTISM OF THE CONVERTS. THE FIRST MASS. PERPETUAL PRESENCE OF THE HOLY SPECIES IN MARY.
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Hail, Eucharistic Face, Epiphany of the Father’s love

Posted on May 6, 2008. Filed under: Uncategorized |

Hail, Festival Day!
Hail, Day of Sion’s sweetest hymns!
Hail, Day of timeless adoration!
Hail, Day of lavish jubilation!
Hail, Day of our most fragrant incense!
Hail, Day of flowers strewn before their Maker!
Hail, Day of flames dancing in the presence of the Fire!
Hail, Day of a silence that is song!
Hail Day of a song become silence!
Hail, Day made radiant by the Face that shines like the sun in full strength!
Hail, Day made lovely by the Face of the fairest of the children of men!
Hail, Day rising to see the Face once hidden in the tabernacle of the Virgin’s womb!
Hail, Day rejoicing in the Human Face of God concealed in bread and wine!
Hail, Eucharistic Face reflecting the Glory of the Father
and bearing the very stamp of His nature!
Hail, Eucharistic Face, Living Icon of the Father!
Hail, Eucharistic Face, Epiphany of the Father’s Love!
Hail, Eucharistic Face, Kindly Light amidst the gloom!
Hail, Eucharistic Face of the Crucified in the Sacrament of Your abiding presence!
Hail, Eucharistic Face of Life conquering death!
Hail, Eucharistic Face of Mercy rising in the night with healing in your rays!
Hail, Eucharistic Face, Sweetness leaving no bitterness!
Hail, Eucharistic Face of the Risen One,
filling earth and heaven with glory
from the rising of the sun even to its setting
in the offering of your pure and eternal Oblation!
Hail, Eucharistic Face raising the dead to life!
Hail, Eucharistic Face breathing peace into every troubled place!
Hail, Eucharistic Face, revelation of a Heart full of mercy and ready to forgive!
Hail, Eucharistic Face of the Ascended One!
Hail, Eucharistic Face of the High Priest interceding for us beyond the veil!
Hail, Eucharistic Face of the Victim reconciling heaven and earth!
Hail, Eucharistic Face all ablaze with the Holy Spirit’s fire!
Hail, Eucharistic Face of the King who will return in glory!
Hail, Eucharistic Face hidden from the powerful, the clever, and the wise!
Hail, Eucharistic Face revealed to the pure of heart!
Hail, Eucharistic Face familiar to little children and to those like them!
Hail, Eucharistic Face of the Divine Wayfarer!
Hail, Eucharistic Face, unrecognized and unknown in the midst of men!
Hail, Eucharistic Face shrouded in silence,
and with us always, even unto the consummation of the world!
Hail, God–With–Us!
Hail, God–Turned–Toward–Us!
Hail, God who with immense yearning desire to share your Pasch with us!
Hail, God–in–Search–of–Those–Who–Hunger!
God–in–Search–of–Those–Who–Thirst!
Hail, O inexhaustible and precious Chalice!
Hail, Day of the Altar and of the Blood!
Hail, Day of the new and everlasting covenant!
Hail, Day that calls us anew to obedience:“All that the Lord has spoken
we will do,and we will be obedient” (Ex 24:7).
“This is my Body which is given for you.
This Chalice poured out for you is the new covenant in my Blood.
Do this in remembrance of me” (cf. Lk 22:19–20).
Hail, Day of the Blood without which there is no pardon!
Hail, Day of the Blood poured out for the refreshment of the weary!
Hail, Day of the Blood that flows, a river of mercy in the wastelands of sin!
Hail, Day of the Blood that vanquishes demons!
Hail, Day of the Blood that consoles in sorrow!
Hail, Day of the Blood that cleanses the entire world of sin!
Hail, Day of the Blood of Christ, Victim and Priest!
Hail, Day of the Blood presented in the sanctuary not made by hands!
Hail, Day of the Blood offered on earth as it is in heaven!
Hail, Precious Chalice lifted up for all to see!
Hail, Precious Chalice, thanksgiving sacrifice worthy of God!
Hail, Precious Chalice held to the lips of the martyrs!
Hail, Precious Chalice strengthening every witness!
Hail, Precious Chalice making pure the impure!
Hail, Precious Chalice containing the Fire of the Divinity!
Hail, Precious Chalice, the antidote for every poison!
Hail, Precious Chalice, the remedy for every ill!
Hail, Day of the Upper Room made ready for eternity!
Hail, Day of the Pasch without end!
Hail, Day of the Bread lifted up in Christ’s holy and venerable hands!
Hail, Day of the blessing uttered by His sacred lips!
Hail, Day of the Body forever given and of the Blood forever poured out!
Hail, Day of the Cenacle opened to every nation on earth!
Hail, Day of the Mystical Supper open to the poor,
the sick, the lame, and the blind!
Hail, Day of Heaven’s open door!
Hail, Day of the Supper of the Lamb!
Hail, Day that sees us prostrate before the Eucharistic Face of God!
Hail, Day on which men do the work of Angels!
Hail, Day on which Angels stand amazed
before the Mystery set before the children of men!
Hail, Day that passes too quickly and never passes!
Hail, Day that begins in time the joys of eternity!
Hail, Day that fills the earth with a foretaste of heaven!
Amen. Alleluia.

(Thank you, Father Mark, for giving words to the song of my heart)
Veni, Creator Spiritus!

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Thine eyes shall see the King in His beauty: they shall behold the land that is very far off. Isaiah xxxiii. 17

Posted on May 6, 2008. Filed under: Uncategorized |

-For the form of this world is passing away. 1 Cor7:31b

Sermon 3 – Cardinal Newman – Unreal Words

We are no longer then in the region of shadows:
we have the true Saviour set before us,
the true reward, and the true means of spiritual renewal.
We know the true state of the soul by nature and by grace,
the evil of sin, the consequences of sinning,
the way of pleasing God, and the motives to act upon.
God has revealed Himself clearly to us;

He has “destroyed the face of the covering cast over all people,
and the veil that is spread over all nations.”

“The darkness is past, and the True Light now shineth.”
[Isa. xxv. 7. 1 John ii. 8.]

And therefore, I say, He calls upon us in turn to “walk in the light as He is in the light.”

The are are ten thousand ways of looking at this world, but only one right way.
The man of pleasure has his way, the man of gain his, and the man of intellect his. Poor men and rich men, governors and governed, prosperous and discontented, learned and unlearned, each has his own way of looking at the things which come before him, and each has a wrong way.

There is but one right way; it is the way in which God looks at the world.
Aim at looking at it in God’s way.
Aim at seeing things as God sees them.
Aim at forming judgements about persons, events, ranks, fortunes, changes, objects, such as God forms.
Aim at looking at this life as God looks at it.
Aim at looking at the life to come, and the world unseen, as God does.

Aim at “seeing the King in all His beauty.”

All things that we see are but shadows to us and delusions, unless we enter into what they really mean.

It is not an easy thing to learn that new language which Christ has brought us.
He has interpreted all things for us in a new way;
He has brought us a religion which sheds a new light on all that happens.
Try to learn this language. Do not get it by rote, or speak it as a thing of course.
Try to understand what you say.
Time is short, eternity is long;
God is great, man is weak; he stands between heaven and hell;
Christ is his Saviour; Christ has suffered for him.
The Holy Ghost sanctifies him; repentance purifies him,
faith justifies, works save.
These are solemn truths, which need not be actually spoken,
except in the way of creed or of teaching; but which must be laid up in the heart.
That a thing is true, is no reason that it should be said, but that it should be done; that it should be acted upon; that it should be made our own inwardly.

Let us avoid talking, of whatever kind;
whether mere empty talking, or censorious talking,
or idle profession, or descanting upon Gospel doctrines,
or the affectation of philosophy,
or the pretence of eloquence.
Let us guard against frivolity,
love of display,
love of being talked about,
love of singularity,
love of seeming original.
Let us aim at meaning what we say,
and saying what we mean;
let us aim at knowing when we understand a truth, and when we do not.
When we do not, let us take it on faith, and let us profess to do so.
Let us receive the truth in reverence,
and pray God to give us a good will, and divine light,
and spiritual strength, that it may bear fruit within us. –

http://www.newmanreader.org/works/parochial/volume5/sermon3.html
Cardinal John Henry Newman

see also
– the homily of the Holy Father Pope Benedict XVI
Yankee Stadium April 2008

And this, dear friends, is the particular challenge which the Successor of Saint Peter sets before you today. As “a chosen people, a royal priesthood, a holy nation”, follow faithfully in the footsteps of those who have gone before you! Hasten the coming of God’s Kingdom in this land! Past generations have left you an impressive legacy. In our day too, the Catholic community in this nation has been outstanding in its prophetic witness in the defense of life, in the education of the young, in care for the poor, the sick and the stranger in your midst. On these solid foundations, the future of the Church in America must even now begin to rise!

True freedom blossoms when we turn away from the burden of sin, which clouds our perceptions and weakens our resolve, and find the source of our ultimate happiness in him who is infinite love, infinite freedom, infinite life. “In his will is our peace”.

see also
Revelation 21

The New Heaven and Earth
1 Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth; for the first heaven and the first earth passed away, and there is no longer any sea. 2 And I saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, made ready as a bride adorned for her husband. 3 And I heard a loud voice from the throne, saying, “Behold, the tabernacle of God is among men, and He will dwell among them, and they shall be His people, and God Himself will be among them, 4 and He will wipe away every tear from their eyes; and there will no longer be any death; there will no longer be any mourning, or crying, or pain; the first things have passed away.” 5 And He who sits on the throne said, “Behold, I am making all things new.” And He said, “Write, for these words are faithful and true.” 6 Then He said to me, “It is done. I am the Alpha and the Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give to the one who thirsts from the spring of the water of life without cost. 7 “He who overcomes will inherit these things, and I will be his God and he will be My son. 8 “But for the cowardly and unbelieving and abominable and murderers and immoral persons and sorcerers and idolaters and all liars, their part will be in the lake that burns with fire and brimstone, which is the second death.” 9 Then one of the seven angels who had the seven bowls full of the seven last plagues came and spoke with me, saying, “Come here, I will show you the bride, the wife of the Lamb.”
The New Jerusalem
10 And he carried me away in the Spirit to a great and high mountain, and showed me the holy city, Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, 11 having the glory of God. Her brilliance was like a very costly stone, as a stone of crystal-clear jasper. 12 It had a great and high wall, with twelve gates, and at the gates twelve angels; and names were written on them, which are the names of the twelve tribes of the sons of Israel. 13 There were three gates on the east and three gates on the north and three gates on the south and three gates on the west. 14 And the wall of the city had twelve foundation stones, and on them were the twelve names of the twelve apostles of the Lamb.

see also
Psalm 101(102)

Psalm 101 next >
Domine, exaudi. A prayer for one in afflict
ion: the fifth penitential psalm.

1 The prayer of the poor man, when he was anxious, and poured out his supplication before the Lord.

2 Hear, O Lord, my prayer: and let my cry come to thee.

3 Turn not away thy face from me: in the day when I am in trouble, incline thy ear to me. In what day soever I shall call upon thee, hear me speedily.

4 For my days are vanished like smoke: and my bones are grown dry like fuel for the fire.

5 I am smitten as grass, and my heart is withered: because I forgot to eat my bread.

6 Through the voice of my groaning, my bone hath cleaved to my flesh.

7 I am become like to a pelican of the wilderness: I am like a night raven in the house.

8 I have watched, and am become as a sparrow all alone on the housetop.

9 My enemies reproached me: and they that praised me did swear against me.

10 For I did eat ashes like bread, and mingled my drink with weeping.

11 Because of thy anger and indignation: for having lifted me up thou hast thrown me down.

12 My days have declined like a shadow, and I am withered like grass.

13 But thou, O Lord, endurest for ever: and thy memorial to all generations.

14 Thou shalt arise and have mercy on Sion: for it is time to have mercy on it, for the time is come.

15 For the stones thereof have pleased thy servants: and they shall have pity on the earth thereof.

16 And the Gentiles shall fear thy name, O Lord, and all the kings of the earth thy glory.

17 For the Lord hath built up Sion: and he shall be seen in his gory.

18 He hath had regard to the prayer of the humble: and he hath not despised their petition.

19 Let these things be written unto another generation: and the people that shall be created shall praise the Lord:

20 Because he hath looked forth from his high sanctuary: from heaven the Lord hath looked upon the earth.

21 That he might hear the groans of them that are in fetters: that he might release the children of the slain:

22 That they may declare the name of the Lord in Sion: and his praise in Jerusalem;

23 When the people assemble together, and kings, to serve the Lord.

24 He answered him in the way of his strength: Declare unto me the fewness of my days.

25 Call me not away in the midst of my days: thy years are unto generation and generation.

26 In the beginning, O Lord, thou foundedst the earth: and the heavens are the works of thy hands.

27 They shall perish but thou remainest: and all of them shall grow old like a garment: And as a vesture thou shalt change them, and they shall be changed.

28 But thou art always the selfsame, and thy years shall not fail.

29 The children of thy servants shall continue: and their seed shall be directed for ever.

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