Prayer

Your Prayer Petitions for the Grotto at Lourdes –

Posted on February 12, 2009. Filed under: Lourdes, Our Lady of Lourdes, Prayer |

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Your Prayer Petitions for the Grotto at Lourdes –

Posted on February 12, 2009. Filed under: Lourdes, Our Lady of Lourdes, Prayer |

bloggingLOURDES Your Prayer petitions for the Grotto at Lourdes

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Lectio Divina as School of Prayer among the Fathers of the Desert

Posted on February 8, 2009. Filed under: Christianity, John Cassian, lectio divina, Prayer, Religion and Spirituality |

:en:St Anthony the GreatImage via Wikipedia

Lectio Divina as School of Prayer among the Fathers of the Desert By Abbot Armand Veilleux, O.C.S.O.

A scholarly piece, with lots of quotations, like this from St. John Cassian: “Brought to life by this food (that of the Scriptures) on which he does not cease to nourish himself, [the monk] penetrates to the point of all the sentiments expressed in the psalms, which he recites henceforth not at all as having been composed by the prophet, but as if he himself were the author, and as a personal prayer…This is, in fact, what the divine Scriptures reveal to us most clearly, and it is their heart and in some way their marrow that are shown to us, when our experience not only allows us to know, but makes us anticipate this very knowledge, and the sense of the words is made known to us, not by some explanation, but by the proof that we ourselves have made of them.”

Source:

http://archive.salvationhistory.com/library/liturgy/prayer/lectio.cfm

***

First : Job 7:1-4.6-7; Second: 1 Cor 9:16-19.22-23; Gospel: Lk 24:13-
THEME of the READINGS
Suffering, sickness and weakness are words that appear in the readings of today’s liturgy. Others accompany them as a response: care, preaching, service. The Gospel presents a typical day in Jesus’ apostolic ministry: he preaches, he heals, he retires to pray, he leaves for other places to preach and cast out devils. In the first reading, Job complains: “I have assigned to me nothing for my own but nights of grief… My life is but a breath, and … my eyes will never again see joy.” Finally, Paul makes himself weak with the weak to save the weak, he makes himself a slave of everyone to win as many as he can (second reading).

DOCTrinal MESSAGE

Human suffering. When Job likens man’s life to military service, he is not focusing on the heroic or glorious aspects of the militia as much as on the meaning of struggling, pain, suffering and punishment. Whether one wants it that way or not, pain is present at the origin, middle and end of human life. There is the pain of the daily toil of work, and the nightmares that molest people from dusk to dawn. There is the reality of illness in all its various forms and the anguish of dying, of having to die and of feeling apprehensive about eternity. There is physical suffering with its cruel, disturbing face, and the suffering of the soul which upsets one’s inner self and tumbles one into a bottomless pit. There is obligatory renunciation because of superior and beautiful decisions, but which as a renunciation continues nevertheless to be painful; and there is voluntary renunciation for the good of others which also brings its own load of suffering. Above all, there is the pain of sin, that pain whose traces linger in the soul even when the sin has been forgiven. How immense is humanity’s pain! The infinite meaninglessness of life and the horrible absurdity! The awareness that pain and suffering will last as long as time, however many breakthroughs are made in medicine and biomedical technology.
The mystery of pain. Pain is a reality outside our door and in our inner selves. Pain is also a mystery. That is, it is something outside the human being’s grasp, however great his extraordinary capacity for understanding; it is something incomprehensible to all. It is also something which in escaping from your grasp you cannot dominate or manage as you will, but which imposes itself upon you and subjugates you. Neither Job nor Peter’s mother-in-law, nor those “possessed by devils” of which the Gospel speaks, sought suffering or sickness; rather, they were the passive subjects of a superior power that was imposed upon them against their will. Pain is also a mystery because it refers us to something or someone superior, above us and far beyond us, who enters into our lives and on whom we must depend. It is a mystery, lastly, because it requires “treatment” by a specialist, not to understand it, but rather to integrate it in our life and to succeed in giving it meaning. For us Christians, the specialist in pain is Our Lord Jesus Christ. It is only he who can introduce us to the science of pain; only he can preach the Gospel or the good news of suffering to us with authority.
The Christian Way. In the liturgical texts there are indications of a Christian reaction to the reality of pain and the mystery of suffering. First of all, as Job teaches us, we must adopt a stance, not of resignation but of a quest for meaning. Far more important than seeking tranquilizers for suffering is the search for its meaning. A search which endures throughout life, because pain accompanies us to the grave. Secondly, we Christians must try to alleviate human pain. The discovery of pain is not an excuse in order to do nothing to soften and alleviate people’s pain. Since suffering is an evil closely linked to sin, we must fight it with determination and efficacy. Jesus did not fold his arms when faced with so many sick people, possessed by devils or terrified by some pain or other. The attitude of service in the face of suffering, as exemplified by Paul who made himself the servant of all, is a quintessentially Christian imperative. Teaching the meaning of pain and bearing authentic witness when facing one’s own suffering in the light of Christ’s mystery, is a high point of the Christian way.

PASTORal SUGGESTIONS
The “beautiful” face of Christian suffering. Can pain be “beautiful”? Is it really the absolute evil in which there is no spark of beauty? Is it possible that a beautiful act can be reflected in the mirror of pain? For some people today, pain is more horrible than death, which is why euthanasia or suicide seem to solve the possible dilemma. For doctors, whose profession is to combat pain and for whom it is an enemy, it must be difficult to think of the beautiful side of suffering. I think telling the relatives of a dying person – of a patient with a terminal illness or of someone who has suffered a gruesome accident – that there can also be a beautiful side to pain, runs the risk being insolent or, at the least, inappropriate. Altogether, suffering has a certain human and Christian “beauty”. Physical or moral pain humanizes and dignifies man in his humanity and makes him more fully man when he accepts it and lives it with nobility of spirit, although his whole body may be contorted with the most unspeakable convulsions. It dignifies those who suffer it and their loved ones, when they bear with it and live it with noble elegance. Above all pain “Christianizes”, that is, it likens us to the great master and artist of pain who is Jesus Christ. His pain is beautiful because it embellishes all humanity, purifying it from the leprosy of sin and instilling in the old body of a fallen humanity the splendor of purity and innocence. A pastoral approach to suffering cannot do without this beautiful aspect of pain. What are the most appropriate ways and times to preach the good news, the beautiful face of suffering?
At the service of the suffering. Jesus Christ was a doctor of bodies and souls. The priest must follow in Christ’s footsteps. By his vocation he must always be available to alleviate human suffering as best he can. Accompanying those who suffer, comforting them with words or simply by being present, sharing an anxiety or a very deep sorrow, praying for those who suffer and getting them to pray with him about their suffering condition… Listening to the sinner in his inner anguish, speaking to him simple but true and authentic words which come from the heart, encouraging the despairing and the depressed, imbuing serenity in those who are overwhelmed and, as it were, devoured by pain… The priest should be, like Christ, a loving and compassionate doctor of bodies and souls. A full-time doctor, tireless, committed to all without reserve, like Jesus Christ, as this Sunday’s Gospel portrays him. Do I visit the sick and the elderly? Do I bring them the comfort of my words and especially the sacraments of Reconciliation and the Eucharist? Do I believe that service to the sick in body and mind is a fundamental element of my ministry? What can be done in my parish, in my religious community, to give a “beautiful” face to suffering?

–Clerus.org Library – Homilies

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Litany of St. Pio of Pietrelcina

Posted on August 4, 2008. Filed under: Prayer | Tags: , , , , |

Lord, have mercy.
Christ, have mercy.
Lord, have mercy.
Christ, hear us.
Christ, graciously hear us.
God the Father of Heaven,
have mercy on us.
God the Son, Redeemer of the World,
have mercy on us.
God the Holy Spirit,
have mercy on us.
Holy Trinity, One God,
have mercy on us.
Holy Mary, pray for us.
St. Francis of Assisi, pray for us.
St. Pio of Pietrelcina, pray for us.
Holy man of God, pray for us.
Faithful servant of the Father, pray for us.
Representative of the Son, pray for us.
Vessel of the Holy Spirit, pray for us.
Victim of Divine Love, pray for us.
Blessed recipient of the mystical espousal, pray for us.
Beloved spiritual son of the Virgin, pray for us.
Fervent promoter of the most Holy Rosary, pray for us.
Lover of the Holy Mysteries, pray for us.
Devoted Son of Mary, pray for us.
Holy priest of God, pray for us.
Dispenser of God’s Sacraments, pray for us.
Sanctified in God’s grace, pray for us.
Consecrated to God, pray for us.
Fortified by His love, pray for us.
Lover of the Eucharist, pray for us.
Defender and lover of the truth, pray for us.
Champion of the faith, pray for us.
Humble friar of prayer, pray for us.
Great intercessor of God, pray for us.
Dispenser of God’s love and mercy, pray for us.
Chaste lover of purity, pray for us.
Lover of poverty, pray for us.
Seraphic son of St. Francis, pray for us.
Man of true Franciscan spirit, pray for us.
Friend of the holy angels, pray for us.
Hope of God’s people, pray for us.
God’s vessel of healing of body and spirit, pray for us.
Testament of God’s word, pray for us.
God’s servant of grace, pray for us.
Wounded victim of Christ, pray for us.
Loving bearer of the Passion of Our Lord, pray for us.

Almighty Father, in Your great Love and Mercy, You gave us your
faithful servant, St. Pio of Pietrelcina. May we experience Your
help and grace in our present need through his intercession. Amen.

Homily – Father DZ Servant and Steward
3 August 2008 here

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From whence shall come my help? My help is in the Name of the Lord, the Lord who made heaven and earth. The Word through Whom all things created were created. God is Love. The Holy Spirit is the Soul of the Church and the Fire of Divine Love. Love is stronger than death.There is no snatching out of the Father’s hand.

Posted on August 3, 2008. Filed under: God, Prayer, Triumph | Tags: , , , , , , , |

4. GOD THE HOLY GHOST AND GRACE


32. How does the Holy Ghost show His love for us?
The Holy Ghost shows His love for us by making us holy and pleasing to God.

33. How does the Holy Ghost make us holy?
The Holy Ghost makes us holy by giving us sanctifying grace.

34. What does sanctifying grace do?
Sanctifying grace makes our soul glow with God’s holiness.

35. How long does sanctifying grace remain in the soul?
Sanctifying grace remains in the soul until we commit mortal sin.

36. What other grace does the Holy Ghost give us?
The Holy Ghost also gives us actual grace.

37. What is actual grace?
Actual grace is a help of the Holy Ghost to avoid evil and to do good.

38. How can we gain sanctifying grace?
We can gain sanctifying grace:
1. By prayer.
2. By good works.
3. By belonging to the Catholic Church.
4. Through the Sacrifice of the Mass.
5. By receiving the Sacraments.

39. What is prayer?
Prayer is speaking lovingly to God.

40. What is a good work?
A good work is anything good done for the love of God.

41. Why did our Lord establish the Catholic Church?
Our Lord established the Catholic Church to teach, govern, and save all men.

42. Who watches over the Catholic Church?
The Holy Ghost watches over the Catholic Church.

43. What is the Sacrifice of the Mass?
The Sacrifice of the Mass is the continuation of the Sacrifice of the Cross.

44. How should we assist at Mass?
We should assist at Mass with attention and piety.

 

source: Penny Catechism

Catholic Tradition.org Children’s Prayers

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The Litany for Holy Communion

Posted on August 3, 2008. Filed under: Prayer | Tags: , , , |

Lord, have mercy on us.
Christ, have mercy on us.
Lord, have mercy on us.
Christ, hear us.
Christ, graciously hear us.
God the Father of Heaven,
Have mercy on us.
God the Son, Redeemer of the world,
Have mercy on us.
God the Holy Spirit,
Have mercy on us.
Holy Trinity, One God,
Have mercy on us.  

Jesus, living Bread which came down from Heaven,
Have mercy on us.
Jesus, Bread from Heaven giving life to the world,
Have mercy on us.
Jesus, hidden God and Savior, etc.
Jesus, Who has loved us with an everlasting love, Jesus,
Whose delights are to be with the children of men,
Jesus, Who has given Thy Flesh for the life of the world,
Jesus, Who invites all to come to Thee,
Jesus, Who promises eternal life to those who receive Thee,
Jesus, Who with desire desires to eat this Pasch with us,
Jesus, ever ready to receive and welcome us,
Jesus, Who stands at our door knocking,
Jesus, Who has said that if we will open to Thee the door,
Thou wilt come in and sup with us,
Jesus, Who receives us into Thy arms and blesses us with the little children,
Jesus, Who suffers us to sit at Thy feet with Magdalen,
Jesus, Who invites us to lean on Thy bosom with the beloved disciple,
Jesus, Who has not left us orphans,
Most dear Sacrament,
Sacrament of love,
Sacrament of sweetness,
Life-giving Sacrament,
Sacrament of strength,
My God and my all,

That our hearts may pant after Thee as the hart
after the fountains of water,
we beseech Thee, hear us.
That Thou wouldst manifest Thyself to us as to
the two disciples in the breaking of bread,
we beseech Thee, hear us.
That we may know Thy voice like Magdalen, etc.
That with a lively faith we may confess with the beloved disciple, “It is the Lord,”
That Thou wouldst bless us who have not seen and yet have believed,
That we may love Thee in the Blessed Sacrament with our whole heart,
with our whole soul, with all our mind, and with all our strength,
That the fruit of each Communion may be fresh love,
That our one desire may be to love Thee and to do Thy will,
That we may ever remain in Thy love,
That Thou wouldst teach us how to receive and welcome Thee,
That Thou wouldst teach us to pray, and Thyself pray within us,
That with Thee every virtue may come into our souls,
That throughout this day Thou wouldst keep us closely united to Thee,
That Thou wouldst give us grace to persevere to the end,
That Thou wouldst then be our support and Viaticum,
That with Thee and leaning on Thee we may safely pass through all dangers,
That our last act may be one of perfect love and
our last breath a long deep sigh to be in Our Father’s house,
That Thy sweet face may smile upon us when we appear before Thee,
That our banishment from Thee, dearest Lord, may not be very long,
That when the time is come, we may fly up from our prison to Thee,
and in Thy Sacred Heart find our rest forever,

Lamb of God, Who takest away the sins of the world,
Spare us, O Lord.
Lamb of God, Who takest away the sins of the world,
Graciously hear us, O Lord.
Lamb of God, Who takest away the sins of the world,
Have mercy on us.

V. Stay with us, Lord, because it is toward evening,
R. And the day is now far spent.

Let Us Pray.
We come to Thee, dear Lord, with the Apostles, saying, “Increase our faith.”
Give us a strong and lively faith in the mystery of Thy Real Presence
in the midst of us. Give us the splendid faith of the centurion, which drew from
Thee such praise. Give us the faith of the beloved disciple to know Thee
in the dark and say, “It is the Lord!” Give us the faith of Martha to confess,
“Thou art the Christ, the Son of the living God.” Give us the faith of Magdalen
to fall at Thy feet crying, “Rabboni, Master.” Give us the faith of all Thy Saints,
to whom the Blessed Sacrament has been Heaven begun on earth.
In every Communion increase our faith; for with faith, love and humility
and reverence and all good will come into our souls. Dearest Lord,
increase our faith. R. Amen.

_________________

for private use only

Source: Catholic Tradition.org

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Vocations Expo Attracted 2,500 Pilgrims per Hour

Posted on August 3, 2008. Filed under: Jesus, Pope, Prayer | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

from (Zenit.org)

Benedict XVI told pilgrims at the Youth Day closing Mass not to fear a call to the priesthood or consecrated life. One statistic indicates his words fell on fertile soil: An average of 2,500 pilgrims an hour visited the Vocations Expo in Sydney.

Some 70,000 international pilgrims took part in Days of the Diocese throughout Australia during the week leading up to World Youth Day. 

Those who didn’t make it to Australia were tuned in to what was happening.

The World Youth Day Web site received over 500,000 unique users from Saturday, July 12, to Sunday, July 20, with the biggest spike in hits occurring Thursday, July 17, when the Pope made his official arrival in a boat-a-cade.

Online streaming received over 250,000 visits during the event period.

Top countries watching online streaming included the United States, the United Kingdom, Italy, Canada, Spain and Germany. And 2,000 media professionals were accredited for the event.

Perhaps the most important statistic has to do with the people designated to intercede for the Sydney event from their places in heaven.

There were 10 World Youth Day Patrons:

Sts. Thérèse of Lisieux,

Faustina Kowalska,

Maria Goretti,

Peter Chanel,

Blesseds Peter To Rot,

Mary MacKillop,

Pier Giorgio Frassati,

Teresa of Calcutta,

and John Paul II

and the Virgin Mary, under the title of

Our Lady of the Southern Cross.

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It is by the Holy Spirit that my Eucharistic presence reaches the souls who adore it to unite them to me, and carries them even before the Face of my Father.

Posted on July 30, 2008. Filed under: Jesus, Prayer | Tags: , , |

There where I am present in the Sacrament of my Love, the Spirit of the Father and the Son is also present. It is by the Holy Spirit that my Eucharistic presence reaches the souls who adore it to unite them to me, and carries them even before the Face of my Father.

____________________
Source: Vultus Christi

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E’en so I love Thee and will love, and in Thy praise will sing, solely because Thou art my God, and my eternal King.

Posted on July 29, 2008. Filed under: Prayer | Tags: |

O Deus, Ego Amo Te

Attributed To St. Francis Xavier S.J.   Tr. Edward Caswall (1506–1552)

My God, I love thee: not because
  I hope for heaven thereby,
Nor because they who love thee not
  Must burn eternally.
 
Thou, O my Jesus, Thou didst me         
  Upon the Cross embrace;
For me didst bear the nails and spear,
  And manifold disgrace.
 
And grief and torments numberless,
  And sweat of agony;         
Yea, death itself; and all for me
  Who was thine enemy.
 
Then why, O Blessèd Jesu Christ,
  Should I not love thee well?—
Not for the hope of winning heaven,         
  Nor of escaping hell;
 
Not with the hope of gaining aught,
  Not seeking a reward;
But as thyself hast lovèd me,
  O ever-loving Lord!         
 
E’en so I love thee and will love,
  And in thy praise will sing,
Solely because thou art my God,
  And my eternal King.

 

_________

Source: Bartleby.com, Harvard Classics

Hymns of the Christian Church.
The Harvard Classics.  1909–14

 

 

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May the Lord give you His peace

Posted on July 29, 2008. Filed under: Jesus, Prayer | Tags: , , , , , |

Let there always be a vigilant sentinel in your soul which will discover anything that might trouble or disturb your conscience. At its first alarm, seize your weapons to defend yourself. Remember that all these evils, and a great many others, no matter how formidable their appearance, are but imaginary for they cannot deprive you of any real good. Consider this fact. Whether God decrees or permits these things for the reasons given above, or for others which we should certainly consider equitable, they are hidden from our comprehension.
You will find it greatly advantageous to preserve a calm mind through all the events in your life. Without it, your pious exercises will be fruitless.
I am convinced that, if the heart is troubled, the enemy is ever able to strike us, and as much as he wishes. Moreover, in that state we are not capable of discerning the true path to follow, the snares that must be avoided to attain virtue.
The enemy detests this peace. For he knows that this is the place where the spirit of God dwells, and that God now desires to accomplish great things in us. Consequently he employs his most devilish means to destroy this peace. He suggests various things that apparently are good. It is a trap; you will soon discover that these desires will destroy the peace of your heart.

____________________

Source: Catholic Tradition.org

THE SPIRITUAL COMBAT, Dom Lorenzo Scupoli

TREATISE ON PEACE OF SOUL AND INNER HAPPINESS, Dom Lorenzo Scupoli

UNIFORMITY WITH GOD’S WILL, Saint Alphonsus de Ligouri

The Chaplet of St. Colette – MP3 / Audio

 

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